Understanding paradoxes

The second law of thermodynamics seems to be violated by a cleverly operated trapdoor. Hot water can, under certain conditions, freeze faster than cold water, even though it must pass the lower temperature on the way to freezing.

Understanding paradoxes

Reading Standards for Literature Lesson Plans | Understanding Paradox | Share My Lesson

With the laws of cause and effect out the window, there naturally arises a number of inconsistencies associated with time travel, and listed here are some of those paradoxes which have given both scientist and time travel movie buffs alike more than a few sleepless nights over the years. Predestination Paradox A Predestination Paradox occurs when the actions of a person traveling back in time becomes part of past events, and may ultimately causes the event he is trying to prevent to take place.

This paradox suggests that things are always destined to turn out the same way, and that whatever has happened must happen. Imagine that your lover dies in a hit-and-run car accident, and you travel back in time to save her from her fate, only to find that on your way to the accident you are the one who accidentally runs her over.

Your attempt to change the past has therefore resulted in a predestination paradox. One way of dealing with this type of paradox is to assume that the version of events you have experienced are already built into a self-consistent version of reality, and that by trying to alter the past you will only end up fulfilling your role in creating an event in history, not altering it.

Alexander Hartdegen witnesss his fiancee being killed by a mugger, leading him to build a time machine to travel back in time to save her from her fate. If she had lived, it would never have existed, so how could you use your machine to go back and save her?

You are the inescapable result of your tragedy, just as I am the inescapable result of you. Bootstrap Paradox A Bootstrap Paradox is a type of paradox in which an object, person, or piece of information sent back in time results in an infinite loop where the object has no discernible origin, and exists without ever being created.

Understanding paradoxes

It is also known as an Ontological Paradox, as ontology is a branch of philosophy concerned with the nature of being, or existence. George Lucas traveling back in time and giving himself the scripts for the Star War movies which he then goes on to direct and gain great fame for would create a bootstrap paradox involving information, as the scripts have no true point of creation or origin.

A bootstrap paradox involving a person could be, say, a 20 year old male time traveler who goes back 21 years, meets a woman, has an affair, and returns home three months later without knowing the woman was pregnant.

Her child grows up to be the 20 year old time traveler, who travels back 21 years through time, meets a woman, and so on. You figure if you knock him off before he meets your grandmother the whole family line including you will vanish and the world will be a better place. According to theoretical physicists, the situation could play out as follows: Time line protection hypothesis: You pop back in time, walk up to him, and point a revolver at his head.

You pull the trigger but the gun fails to fire. The bullets in the chamber have dents in the firing caps. You point the gun elsewhere and pull the trigger.

Point it at your grandfather.A paradox is a statement that, despite apparently sound reasoning from true premises, leads to an apparently-self-contradictory or logically unacceptable conclusion. A paradox involves contradictory-yet-interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and persist over time.

Some logical paradoxes are known to be invalid arguments but are still valuable . It also demonstrates the centrality of value paradoxes to cross cultural marketing communications, and uses the Hofstede model to help readers see how their understanding of cultural relationships in one country/region can be extended to other countries/regions.

A paradox is a statement that, despite apparently valid reasoning from true premises, leads to an apparently-self-contradictory or logically unacceptable conclusion.

A paradox involves contradictory-yet-interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and persist over time. Some logical paradoxes are known to be invalid arguments but are still valuable in promoting critical thinking.

Understanding the privacy paradox

Liar Paradox. The Liar Paradox is an argument that arrives at a contradiction by reasoning about a Liar Sentence.

Understanding paradoxes

The Classical Liar Sentence is the self-referential sentence. 43 Understanding the Paradoxes of Multi-l evel Governing Andrew Jordan, Harro van Asselt, Frans Berkhout, Dave Huitema, and Tim Rayner.

In the modern world people often say they care about privacy, but their actions don't reflect their words.

Exploring this privacy paradox is a new infographic from privacy app company Keepsafe.

List of paradoxes - Wikipedia